Uncategorized

What this author so eloquently explains in her piece about learning a language, could be applied to every aspect of our lives. It resonates with me in many levels. Afterall, we are all learning to do LIFE.

A simple life put in simple language

Thinking back…

Was there anything more uncomfortable than sitting in a classroom when you were 13?

pupitres_y_sillas_si_uso Schoolroom chairs ready to be discarded. Photo Credit My heart goes out to some of my adult students… learning either English or Spanish.

I can see, no…I can feel, how uncomfortable they are, squeezing into those tiny chair/desk affairs that have been popular in schools in Spain for the last twenty years.

Teaching in private language academies in Spain, I have had to watch all stratas of society deal with the ‘classroom furniture ‘ provided by the Director of the School, who had never had to actually sit in this furniture herself  for a whole hour, EVER!

student_desk Hybrid chair/desks Photo credit I have seen grown men with beer guts trying to manouevre themselves self-consciously into these contraptions. I had to look away.

I have seen pregnant women discreetly attempting  not to harm their unborn…

View original post 982 more words

Uncategorized

Shadow Syllabus

Reblogging because Work, feelings/insights like the ones portrayed here need to be circulated again and again. The Author IS the right voice in the right time. This piece serves to reaffirm our faith (if ever we feel we’ve lost it) in our own humanity. I am glad I stumbled upon this one (via Cheri Lucas) I hope you find value in it as well. Selma

Sonya Huber

  1. IMG_3738I’ll tell you exactly how to get an A, but you’ll have a hard time hearing me.
  2. I could hardly hear my own professors when I was in college over the din and roar of my own fear.
  3. Those who aim for A’s don’t get as many A’s as those who abandon the quest for A’s and seek knowledge or at least curiosity.
  4. I had bookmarked a citation for that fact, and now I can’t find it anywhere.
  5. The only way to seek knowledge is to open your hands and let your opinions drop, but that requires even more fear.
  6. The goals and outcomes I am required to put on my syllabus make me depressed; they are the illusion of controlling what cannot be controlled.
  7. I end up changing everything halfway through the semester anyway because the plan on paper is never what the living class ends up being about.

View original post 708 more words

Uncategorized

Moonlight Serenade

Here is a gem I picked up yesterday. I enjoyed this story tremendously. I really DIG this author. I bet you will too.

little word studio

By Melissa Kandel

There was no way around it: Luna had lost the moon. The revelation was quick but biting and it happened last night around dusk. She had been sitting with her cat, Marama, on the hill overlooking a town fading to pale, evening blue and there assumed her usual moon-watching position: Luna tucked her legs behind her, adjusted her shoulders, craned her neck and looked up to the sky with the confidence of a professional used to this sort of thing.

Why wouldn’t she be confident? Luna had spent half her twenty-years-long life sitting on the hill, searching for a moon she was meant to watch. And on every night except the last one, she had found it. But yesterday, when Luna hunted the sky for that familiar celestial orb, she found nothing. 

Luna wouldn’t have immediately thought this meant trouble, if not for Marama placing a paw…

View original post 925 more words

Uncategorized

Freewheeling through Rural Andalusia: The Via Verde of Seville (Photo Story)

I felt as if I had secretly tagged along and then I found that I was really enjoying the bike ride alongside Tim. I loved it so much that I’ve decided to reblog. And the photography– oh the photography, excellent. I’ll let it rest in my site for a while. Hope you don’t mind Tim. Thank you. Selma.

Lives and Times

Not far north of Seville, there is a track winding back through the northern slopes of Andalusia, through the Sierra Morena, a gorgeous corrugated mountain range covered in olive and oak trees under which graze pigs, sheep and goat. The track follows and old railway line built a century ago to service an iron mine at the end of the line. Mostly dead straight and mostly an easy incline, the Via Verde is the perfect way to see Andalusia by bike. I followed its twenty or so kilometres up and back to see what I could see.

View original post 405 more words